Trade with Kin Yields Completed Pages

So Kin over at I Feel Like a Collector Again sent this package in return with me helping him out on his 1986 Topps set. I gotta be honest, I wasn’t expecting these in return that’s for sure and they are beautiful condition! He said he got a heck a deal and I hoping he can find some others for another future trade.

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In the package was nine burlap beauties that you’ll see ended up completing FOUR pages in my 1968 Topps set album. Always love vintage leader cards, especially when they contain THREE HoFers on one card!!

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This batch here came in handy as you’ll see below.

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Also in the package, was four 1973 Topps that completed TWO pages towards my set and with the 1984 Topps Mike Krukow, I’m one more card closer to finishing that set. So with that, let’s see some completed pages …

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1968 Topps #91-99

Card that completed the page: Ed Kranepool (92)

Favorite card: Gary Sutherland (98), just a cool vintage bunting pose during spring training. The green grass, blue cloudless sky, and a brand new, bright red Phillies cap, lotta goodness here. Not gonna lie, I almost went with the Senators Rookie Stars because at first glance I though the guys name was Dick Hold, not Nold.

Best photograph: Gary Sutherland, see above.

Best career: Rocky Colavito (99). Rocky was six-time All-Star for three different teams (Cleveland, Detroit, Kansas City) and also finished in the top five voting for MVP four times. A fan favorite wherever he went, he slugged 374 homers and knocked in another 1,159 runs. Over the course of 14-year career, he batted .266. above he’s pictured as a White Sox, but would be purchased by the Dodgers in March of 1968, only to be released in July and finished out the season with the New York Yankees. The is Rocky’s last Topps card.

Number of Red Sox: Zero.

Past/Future Red Sox: Goose egg again.

Interesting fact: Tom Phoebus (97) became only the seventh pitcher since 1900 to pitch shutouts in his first two games. In his 1966 debut, he pitched a complete-game shutout, beating Dean Chance, 2-0. He struck out eight, walked two, and allowed only four hits. Five days later Phoebus got his second start and pitched his second shutout. Pitching against Catfish Hunter in Kansas City, he blanked the Athletics 4-0. Oh, he also threw a no-hitter during the 1968 season against the defending American League champion Boston Red Sox at Memorial Stadium on April 27.

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1968 Topps #118-126

Card that completed the page: Two this page; Mel Stottlemyre (120) and Jimmie Hall (121).

Favorite card: Mark Belanger (118), just love the camera angle, the vintage flannel Baltimore road jersey. Just a nice looking card.

Best photograph: Gene Mauch (122) photographed calling out for a beer, hot dog, or trying to get Dick Allen’s attention. Not sure but wished manager cards of today were as interesting as this one.

Best career: Toss up between Mark Belanger (118) and Mel Stottlemyer (120). Belanger was one of the best slick fielding shortstops of the 1970s, winning eight Gold Glove Awards. A career .228 hitter, he was named an American League All-Star in 1976 and played all but one of his entire 18-year career with the Baltimore Orioles. He finished with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1982. Stottlemyer was a five-time A.L. All-Star selection and was the glue that held those New York Yankee rotations together during the middle 1960s thru the early 1970s. He donned the Bronx pinstripes for his entire 11-year career, going 164-139 along with a career earn run average of 2.97.

Number of Red Sox: One; Jose Santiago (123). After a trade with the Kansas City Athletics, Santiago was an integral part of the Sox pitching staff as the chief swingman. His best stretch came from 1966-1968. In his five years in the back bay, Jose went 33-23 with a ERA of 3.42

Past/Future Red Sox: One; Gene Mauch appears as a Red Sox in the 1957 Topps set at #342 — a card on my Sox want list.

Interesting fact: In writing up about this page, I learned that Jose Santiago was named to the American League All-Star team in 1968. Actually Stottlemyer was on the same All-Star team as well, but neither appeared in the the mid-Summer classic won by the N.L. 1-0.

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1968 Topps #190-198

Card that completed the page: Dan Frisella (191)

Best career: Carl Yastrzemski, just ask @Markhoyle4

Number of Red Sox: One; Carl Yastrzemski Checklist (192).

Past/Future Red Sox: Zero, but Don Buford’s son Damon played some for the Sox in the late 1990s and he was a heck of a fielder.

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1968 Topps #586-594

Card that completed the page: Dick Nen (591).

Favorite card: Really not one here that screams out to me. I do like the old Angels cap with the halo.

Best photograph: Not a lot to like with the high numbers. A number of “traded” guys without hats and in old team’s uniforms.

Best career: Tommy Harper (590)

Number of Red Sox: One; Lee Stange (593).

Past/Future Red Sox: Three; Jim Pagliaroni (586), Dick Schofield (588), and Tommy Harper.

Interesting fact: Dick “Ducky” Schofield is the father of former Major League Baseball player Dick Schofield and the grandfather of current MLB outfielder Jayson Werth. Ducky, Dick, and Jayson all played for the Los Angeles Dodgers at one point in their respective careers.

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1973 Topps #10-18

Card that completed the page: Fred Gladding (17)

Favorite card: George Hendrick (13) in a page of blue and gray uniforms, the classic Oakland A’s uniform keeps pulling me in.

Best photograph: Maybe the Leroy Stanton (18)? Reminds me of the classic Topps photographs from the 1957 and 1959 Topps sets.

Best career: I’ll go with Don Sutton (10) in that he is Cooperstown.

Number of Red Sox: One; Sonny Siebert (14).

Past/Future Red Sox: One; Don Zimmer was a manager and coach for the Sox.

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1973 Topps #127-135

Card that completed the page: Milwaukee Brewers team card (127).

Favorite card: Pete Rose (130). It’s not the best image of Pete Rose as he looks like he’s watching a pop-up go foul, but it is the Hit King.

Best photograph: Dave Roberts (133). Can’t beat the yellow mustard Padres unis on a sunny afternoon in Wrigley, right?

Best career: Pete Rose. All-time MLB hit leader. A shame he’s not in the Hall of Fame.

Number of Red Sox: One; Eddie Kasko, manager … and look who else is on the coaches card … one Lee Stange from the 1968 Topps pages.

Past/Future Red Sox: One; Ted Sizemore (128).

Interesting fact: I’ve met Pete Rose’s then, long-time friend Tommy Gioiosa. So back when I was a kid, this guy would periodically come into the baseball card store where I worked over the years. Both owners knew him and the guy would always bring in autographed Pete Rose balls, 8×10 photos, and occasionally autographed, game used bats, batting gloves, even cleats I believe for us to sell. Gioiosa would be the one to tell the world that the All-Time Hit King had bet on baseball.

“I’ve sat in his office and watched him bet on baseball games, including the Reds and many other baseball teams…”

— Gioiosa in a televised interview conducted by ESPN, 1990.

And on that interesting note, I thank you for reading and thank God the sounds of Spring Training are in the air.

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Also of note, looking to find trading partners who collect New York Yankee, Oakland A’s, St. Louis Cardinals, and Texas Rangers … would like to streamline my collection while helping out other collectors. Hit me up on Twitter, email me, or leave a comment.

Flashback Friday: 70’s Style

Just a quick post of a nice mail day today. Picked up some rookie cards for my 1970’s vintage album — all for just a little more than a 2017 Topps retail blaster box!

In the batch we have — outside of Johnny Bench — the three other great catchers of the decade in Munson (1970 Topps), Simmons (1971), and Fisk (1972). A couple of Hall of Fame pitchers in Blyleven (1971) and Gossage (1973) and a Red Sox Hall of Famer, a guy that is just outside of the Cooperstown Hall of Fame, and long time Sox favorite … Dwight “Dewey” Evans (1973). Also of note on Evan’s rookie is that of Alonza, or more commonly known Al, Bumbry, who was the 1973 American League Rookie of the Year. Enjoy this groovy Flashback Friday …..

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A Far Out Mail Day

It’s been a crazy week since I last posted. No chance to play as I had freelance on top of work. Heck, even today — working from home for a dentist cleaning — work was too busy to escape to a different LCS I hadn’t been to in maybe 10 months. But alas, it was a good day because these goodies arrived in the mail.

I am putting together a vintage 70’s album with all the Topps I had in a shoebox and top loaders, plus my recent Hostess, Kelloggs pick ups, as well as a couple of other items. I realized while thumbing through some of the years there were a number of cards I wanted to add to this collection. This is the first batch of several coming to me this week and next.

Today’s haul includes two Hall of Famers, four MVP Awards, a collected 49 All-Star Game selections, sixteen Gold Gloves, and 10 Silver Slugger Awards — and a guy who was traded WITH a Hall of Famer.

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1972 Topps Rookie Stars A.L.–N.L. #761

First up, this beauty of a high number! Ron Cey and Ben Oglivie’s rookie card. The Red Sox actually had three high number rookie cards in the 1972 Topps set, a tough one for team set collectors. This Oglivie, Rick Miller (#741), and John Curtis (#724). This will look nice alongside some of the other Rookie Stars I have from this set. Oh, and the guy who was traded WITH a Hall of Famer … Bernie Williams along with Willie McCovey, was sent to San Diego for Mike Caldwell after the 1973 season.

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1973 Topps Rookie Third Basemen #615

Mike Schmidt’s rookie card and some guy Cey is crashing the party again. This is a card I already own in my 1973 Topps Set, but wanted another for the 70’s album. Price was a steal as it has a couple of soft corners and typical of the 1973 and 1974 Topps issues, is miscut. This cut is actually a smidge better than the one in my set yet cost me $65 less! Great coloring and no black printing marks to boot. We all know how Schmidt’s and Cey’s careers turned out but in reading about John Hilton I learned the following:

  • Was the 1971 #1 over all pick in the January Draft (they had two drafts back then) by the Padres. The only player worth mentioning in this January Phase that had any sort of a career was John Wathan taken third picks later by Kansas City.
  • Following his freshman year at Rice, played on a semi-pro ball team that had former Yankees OFer Bob Cerv as its manager along with future big leaguers Ron Guidry, Steve Rogers, and Phil Garner.
  • His first home run was against the Cubs’ Fergie Jenkins.
  • Hilton spent two-plus seasons in Japan, winning a championship with Yakult.

Seems Hilton was a solid defender as he won a couple minor league gold gloves as he bounced through the Blue Jays, Japan, Pirates organizations, and a Mexican League club. He now runs the Arizona School of Baseball.

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1974 Topps Dave Parker #252

Next up, this rookie card of the Cobra. Two bucks got me one of the best right field arms in baseball history. If for some reason you have never seen it, I present you the Cobra Cannon. Gary Carter makes a wonderful play on the ball, but he had to in part because he looked shocked that Parker was even able to make a play a possibility. It’s the All-Star Game, so sure, he wasn’t used to that sort of thing first-hand out of Parker, but it sticks out. You look at Parker’s stats from the 1970’s and it’s easy to see why many thought he was one of the best, if not the best all-around player in the game. He played incredible defense, he could hit period, hit for power, stole double-digits, and had an OBA close just under .400. Just two bad drugs got in the way for a short while.

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1974 Topps Hank Aaron #1

And we close with a card touting the NEW all-time home run king even though he wasn’t yet. Yep that’s right, going into the 1974 season Hank Aaron’s homer count stood at 713. Of course, everyone knew he would break Babe Ruth’s mark, and Topps decided to dedicate it’s flagship issue with Aaron leading off as the number one card.

Hank Aaron’s notable home runs:

  • #1 … April 23rd, 1954 — Vic Raschi (St. Louis)
  • #714 … April 4, 1974 — Jack Billingham (Cincinnati)
  • #715 … April 8, 1974 — Al Downing (Los Angeles)
  • last and #755 … July 20, 1976 — Dick Drago (California)

And with that, off to round up some trade bait to post this week. If there are any Don Mattingly fans, ping me as I have some oddball stuff I will be posting.

Thanks for reading!

Holy Bleepin LCS Haul!

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Ok so last Friday I posted the above image from an afternoon at my LCS. Today I have another vacation day as the schools have a half day (too bad I am watching kids this afternoon or I would be back there or maybe Central Sportscards in RI) so I am just finally getting a chance to shoot and post. Alrighty lets jump in ….

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First up, some vintage Topps sets needs. I almost missed the 1959 Topps Mathews as it was obscured by a couple of other cards in his vintage case. The other two 59’s I may upgrade down the road but for right now they work for me. Thought I had the ’68 Topps Frank Roby but nope — card looks like it just came out of pack too!

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More vintage or semi vintage Topps needs — this time a bunch of 1973s including the great Bob Gibson! The Gibson was another card I have seen many times and thought I had, but nope.

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Moving into my childhood years, some 1984 Topps and I am now just a couple of cards shy from completing this set. I still need to track down a partial Traded Set as I have the Gooden RC already. I haven’t checked in a while to see what a complete goes for so maybe that’s the easier route.

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FINALLY! The 1980’s “black beauty” is complete. I thought I was going to be one card shy, but in a large monster box of 1986 Topps was the guy to close it out … Scott Thompson. I have an 800 count box of doubles from recent trades should anyone be tackling this set. Was also able to pick up a few more rack pack Glossy All-Stars as well as some “Traded to …” O-Pee-Chee cards. I know a couple of these guys do not appear in the traded set, such as Mike Stenhouse how is pictured in a Twins uniform but designated as a Red Sox player.

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Next, some miscellaneous interests I collect …
• 1969 Topps Deckle Edge Bob Gibson … he actually also had an OPC version but didn’t grab that.
• I love vintage combo cards and really need to put together a want list.
• Vintage leader cards, same with these — love having a card with 3-4 HOFers on it. List to follow.
• A couple of guys in Newsom and Bender to add to my No Hitters Collection

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A bunch of random Sox here, including an Oil Can Boyd rookie. I don’t have a 53 Bowman B&W so didn’t mind that it’s got some creases. He probably gave it to me for free. The Josh Beckett Opening Day card is cool … it opens up a different bunch of ways. That had been sitting in a Sox box for the last year so I rescued it. The comic issue (help me out Mark Hoyle) is I believe Rico Petrocelli but I think it’s missing the cover or something. Not sure the year.

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Moving along to my current favorite Red Sox player — Mookie Betts. Grabbed some I didn’t have and one of them is a rookie card too (Stadium Club).

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Now onto a whole mess of Kelloggs!!!! First some 1975 versions including a sweet Brooks Robsinson, Gaylord Perry (got doubles if anyone collect Indians or Kelloggs), and the original Fergie. These guys are not too curved so hopefully they stay that way.

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Some major star power in this collection of ’76s!!!! Eck rookie, Joe Morgan, Rose, Yaz, Rice, Brock, Bench Carter, Reggie!!!!! This stack is curved but really want to put into sheets.

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Some 1977 Kelloggs including The Bird’s rookie card and a sweet looking Dave Winfield.

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And the last of the cereal goodies, a 1973 Billy Williams, 1978 Reggie and NL MVP Dave Parker along with a few 1979 versions.

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Next we move onto the other 1970s food issue — Hostess cards!! We got the super-fro Oscar Gamble leading things off with some 1975s.

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Next a start on a partial set of 1976 Hostess. Some better stars here with Morgan, Niekro, Perry, Parker, and a poorly cut Nolan Ryan.

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Some 1977 Hostess above and it’s too bad that the stack the owner had was even larger but they were all trimmed TOO much (see the Vida Blue) that I passed. So, only a couple here that I chose.

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A couple of 78’s and I’ll be trimming up Boomer so he’s got a cleaner cut.

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And lastly, a handful of 1979 Hostess cards. Man, could the Mariners PLEASE bring back the trident!!! Between the two Bill Steins cards, it really is a classic look

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Next couple of images are some cards I find appealing so I try to grab when I can. The above are some Topps Archives inserts including my first “1972 Basketball” and “1969 4-in-1” cards.

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Next some Panini Golden Age inserts — all of these are my firsts. I love the Tip Top Bread cards and I think there’s a couple more Pre-Wars players I need.

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Up next, we go round and round with some Colgan’s Chip discs. I could have grabbed some other current players but this is early 1900s era set that I wanted just players who played during that time with the exception of a couple of guys like Satchel Paige and Jackie Robinson.

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And lastly, we close with one of my favorite vintage sets of all time — the 1955 Bowman set. I have a couple of others so this will be a set I will try to work on here and there. As you can see, this is a collector’s grade looking collection and that is fine with me. I would love to trade for any similar condition cards to help me build this set. The Yogi cost me a buck, and the lot probably five bucks total. So if you can help me out, please drop me a line.

As you can see, I hit on a wide variety of needs on this trip. I must have easily killed four hours and with then exception of a couple people towards the end, I was the only one there. It truly was some well deserved “me” time.