A Trade with Highly Subjective and Completely Arbitrary

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A couple weeks ago, while blog hopping, I came upon Brian over at Highly Subjective and Completely Arbitrary. A couple of emails later, and the above package arrived. He will have a nice return coming back his way in the form of some vintage 60’s HoFers as he’s working on a bunch of sets. Without further ado and since many will be looking for a distraction tonight …

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Brian sent along a bunch of clean, sharp 1959 Topps cards for my growing set! These cards are absolutely beautiful and helps boost the appearance of my set. A couple of former Red Sox in the form of Mickey Vernon and Gus Zernial. Sal Maglie tossed a no-no with the Dodgers in 1956 and I love the classic baseball pose of one Harry Simpson.

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All in all, I was able to cross off nineteen numbers with this trade—that’s a great mail day!!! Billy Muffett would be appear as a Red Sox in the 1961 and 1962 Topps sets.

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And I have always liked these Sporting News Rookie Stars. This handful contains the Ron Fairly rookie and future Red Sox Willie Tasby, who would appear in the 1961 Post Cereal issue.

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Next up V-I-N-T-A-G-E SOX!!!!! A couple of Pre-War issues here to boot—all three will go nicely into my All-Time Sox album. On the left, is a 1934 Diamond Stars issue of Max Bishop. This is the first ’34 Diamond Stars card in my collection. Bishop had one particular notable game that year — on July 8, 1934, when he walked eight times in the doubleheader in Boston, tying his own major-league record.

In the middle is a 1940 Play Ball card of Denny Galehouse. Denny actually pitched for the Red Sox on different occasions. His first stop during 1939–40, he went a combined 15-16. Returning to the Hub in 1947–49, he would finish winning 19 and losing 15.

And on the right, a 1949 Bowman Jack Kramer. Before coming to Boston, Kramer was a two-time all-star as a St. Louis Brown. In 1948, Jack led the American League with a .783 winning percentage as he finished with 18 wins (AL-6th).

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And lastly, two more Sox cards. Don Buddin adorning a 1961 Post Cereal and a 1965 Topps Rico Petrocelli rookie card for my Sox rookie card collection. Both are welcome additions, especially Rico where I have a dupe of this card, but that one sits in my 1965 Topps album.

Brian also included a nice stack of 1984 and 1986 Topps cards. In the last week plus, I have made a serious dent in both of these sets thanks to a couple of bloggers. Thank you again Brian and I’ll be sending out your cards on Thursday morning—hope to trade again as your list is pretty lengthy!

Shoot em up Tex

On this date September 27, 1942…

A day before Ted Williams, Dom DiMaggio, and Johnny Pesky enter military service, Sox hurler Cecil “Tex” Hughson strikes out only one batter. That one strikeout was enough to tie Buck Newsom for the American League Strikeout Crown with 113. Not since Cy Young in 1901, had a Red Sox pitcher led the league in strikeouts. Tex also won 22 games that season, also leading the junior circuit. Boston would go on to win 7-6

1949 Bowman #199 Cecil “Tex” Hughson

img_3832img_3833Tex Hughson was a big right-handed power pitcher out of the University of Texas who principally wore the number 21 during his tenure with the Red Sox, just like another big Texan, Roger Clemens. Despite military service and arm problems, Hughson pitched his entire big-league career for the Red Sox during the decade of the 1940s with three straight all-star selections.

Tex was especially effective against the World Series-bound Yankees in 1942, going 5-1 and prompting the quote below.

“I would rather beat the Yankees once than any other team twice … They were the best, and they were cocky, particularly in New York with those Yankee pinstripes on. It was as if you ought not to beat them. You ought to just go out there and rather politely lose.”

Along with his 96-54 career record, Hughson had a 2.94 ERA, 10th on the Red Sox all-time list (through 2014) among pitchers with at least 1,000 innings. He struck out 693 and walked only 372 in 1,375 2/3 innings. His 99 complete games place him 10th on the Red Sox all-time list, and his 19 shutouts place him in a tie for seventh place on the list. The 13 consecutive wins at home in 1944 tie him with Boo Ferris for the Red Sox record in that department.

I picked up this card earlier this summer as I was obtaining members of the Red Sox Hall of Fame. Cecil “Tex” Hughson was inducted on November 14, 2002.