Trade with Kin Yields Completed Pages

So Kin over at I Feel Like a Collector Again sent this package in return with me helping him out on his 1986 Topps set. I gotta be honest, I wasn’t expecting these in return that’s for sure and they are beautiful condition! He said he got a heck a deal and I hoping he can find some others for another future trade.

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In the package was nine burlap beauties that you’ll see ended up completing FOUR pages in my 1968 Topps set album. Always love vintage leader cards, especially when they contain THREE HoFers on one card!!

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This batch here came in handy as you’ll see below.

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Also in the package, was four 1973 Topps that completed TWO pages towards my set and with the 1984 Topps Mike Krukow, I’m one more card closer to finishing that set. So with that, let’s see some completed pages …

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1968 Topps #91-99

Card that completed the page: Ed Kranepool (92)

Favorite card: Gary Sutherland (98), just a cool vintage bunting pose during spring training. The green grass, blue cloudless sky, and a brand new, bright red Phillies cap, lotta goodness here. Not gonna lie, I almost went with the Senators Rookie Stars because at first glance I though the guys name was Dick Hold, not Nold.

Best photograph: Gary Sutherland, see above.

Best career: Rocky Colavito (99). Rocky was six-time All-Star for three different teams (Cleveland, Detroit, Kansas City) and also finished in the top five voting for MVP four times. A fan favorite wherever he went, he slugged 374 homers and knocked in another 1,159 runs. Over the course of 14-year career, he batted .266. above he’s pictured as a White Sox, but would be purchased by the Dodgers in March of 1968, only to be released in July and finished out the season with the New York Yankees. The is Rocky’s last Topps card.

Number of Red Sox: Zero.

Past/Future Red Sox: Goose egg again.

Interesting fact: Tom Phoebus (97) became only the seventh pitcher since 1900 to pitch shutouts in his first two games. In his 1966 debut, he pitched a complete-game shutout, beating Dean Chance, 2-0. He struck out eight, walked two, and allowed only four hits. Five days later Phoebus got his second start and pitched his second shutout. Pitching against Catfish Hunter in Kansas City, he blanked the Athletics 4-0. Oh, he also threw a no-hitter during the 1968 season against the defending American League champion Boston Red Sox at Memorial Stadium on April 27.

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1968 Topps #118-126

Card that completed the page: Two this page; Mel Stottlemyre (120) and Jimmie Hall (121).

Favorite card: Mark Belanger (118), just love the camera angle, the vintage flannel Baltimore road jersey. Just a nice looking card.

Best photograph: Gene Mauch (122) photographed calling out for a beer, hot dog, or trying to get Dick Allen’s attention. Not sure but wished manager cards of today were as interesting as this one.

Best career: Toss up between Mark Belanger (118) and Mel Stottlemyer (120). Belanger was one of the best slick fielding shortstops of the 1970s, winning eight Gold Glove Awards. A career .228 hitter, he was named an American League All-Star in 1976 and played all but one of his entire 18-year career with the Baltimore Orioles. He finished with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1982. Stottlemyer was a five-time A.L. All-Star selection and was the glue that held those New York Yankee rotations together during the middle 1960s thru the early 1970s. He donned the Bronx pinstripes for his entire 11-year career, going 164-139 along with a career earn run average of 2.97.

Number of Red Sox: One; Jose Santiago (123). After a trade with the Kansas City Athletics, Santiago was an integral part of the Sox pitching staff as the chief swingman. His best stretch came from 1966-1968. In his five years in the back bay, Jose went 33-23 with a ERA of 3.42

Past/Future Red Sox: One; Gene Mauch appears as a Red Sox in the 1957 Topps set at #342 — a card on my Sox want list.

Interesting fact: In writing up about this page, I learned that Jose Santiago was named to the American League All-Star team in 1968. Actually Stottlemyer was on the same All-Star team as well, but neither appeared in the the mid-Summer classic won by the N.L. 1-0.

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1968 Topps #190-198

Card that completed the page: Dan Frisella (191)

Best career: Carl Yastrzemski, just ask @Markhoyle4

Number of Red Sox: One; Carl Yastrzemski Checklist (192).

Past/Future Red Sox: Zero, but Don Buford’s son Damon played some for the Sox in the late 1990s and he was a heck of a fielder.

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1968 Topps #586-594

Card that completed the page: Dick Nen (591).

Favorite card: Really not one here that screams out to me. I do like the old Angels cap with the halo.

Best photograph: Not a lot to like with the high numbers. A number of “traded” guys without hats and in old team’s uniforms.

Best career: Tommy Harper (590)

Number of Red Sox: One; Lee Stange (593).

Past/Future Red Sox: Three; Jim Pagliaroni (586), Dick Schofield (588), and Tommy Harper.

Interesting fact: Dick “Ducky” Schofield is the father of former Major League Baseball player Dick Schofield and the grandfather of current MLB outfielder Jayson Werth. Ducky, Dick, and Jayson all played for the Los Angeles Dodgers at one point in their respective careers.

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1973 Topps #10-18

Card that completed the page: Fred Gladding (17)

Favorite card: George Hendrick (13) in a page of blue and gray uniforms, the classic Oakland A’s uniform keeps pulling me in.

Best photograph: Maybe the Leroy Stanton (18)? Reminds me of the classic Topps photographs from the 1957 and 1959 Topps sets.

Best career: I’ll go with Don Sutton (10) in that he is Cooperstown.

Number of Red Sox: One; Sonny Siebert (14).

Past/Future Red Sox: One; Don Zimmer was a manager and coach for the Sox.

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1973 Topps #127-135

Card that completed the page: Milwaukee Brewers team card (127).

Favorite card: Pete Rose (130). It’s not the best image of Pete Rose as he looks like he’s watching a pop-up go foul, but it is the Hit King.

Best photograph: Dave Roberts (133). Can’t beat the yellow mustard Padres unis on a sunny afternoon in Wrigley, right?

Best career: Pete Rose. All-time MLB hit leader. A shame he’s not in the Hall of Fame.

Number of Red Sox: One; Eddie Kasko, manager … and look who else is on the coaches card … one Lee Stange from the 1968 Topps pages.

Past/Future Red Sox: One; Ted Sizemore (128).

Interesting fact: I’ve met Pete Rose’s then, long-time friend Tommy Gioiosa. So back when I was a kid, this guy would periodically come into the baseball card store where I worked over the years. Both owners knew him and the guy would always bring in autographed Pete Rose balls, 8×10 photos, and occasionally autographed, game used bats, batting gloves, even cleats I believe for us to sell. Gioiosa would be the one to tell the world that the All-Time Hit King had bet on baseball.

“I’ve sat in his office and watched him bet on baseball games, including the Reds and many other baseball teams…”

— Gioiosa in a televised interview conducted by ESPN, 1990.

And on that interesting note, I thank you for reading and thank God the sounds of Spring Training are in the air.

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Also of note, looking to find trading partners who collect New York Yankee, Oakland A’s, St. Louis Cardinals, and Texas Rangers … would like to streamline my collection while helping out other collectors. Hit me up on Twitter, email me, or leave a comment.

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