More 59s from the Shriners

So going to try to bang out a quick, long-awaited post as I have absolutely had no time lately. I feel as the last two weeks have been barely sleep, work, eat, freelance, barely sleep, feed the dog, let out the dog, feed the cats, pick up the kids stuff, soccer games, practices, and on and on and on. So before I start what hopefully will just be an hour of freelance, here are the 1959 Topps I was able to grab at the Shriner’s show a couple of weeks ago.

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First up, several cards that I found to be favorites of mine. The set’s opening card Ford Frick, the Commissioner of Baseball. Frick was the National League president from 1934 to 1951, and then became the third Commissioner of Major League Baseball from 1951 to 1965. The Blasingame and Bolling cards are classic fielding poses from the 1950’s sets. Something about those cards and the ballparks in the background always get my attention. Don’s is set in Wrigley and there’s no mistaking the classic facade of Old Yankee Stadium on the Bolling card. I found Tex Clevenger’s card interesting as it has (maybe that day’s starter) a pitcher warming up with the catcher in the background.

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Next up, some miscellaneous stars and well knowns. Bobby Thomson was winding down his career and would move onto Boston in the 1960 Topps set. Billy Martin had drunk himself out of New York and Billy Pierce was one of the top American League hurlers of the 50s. Cool to see the LA Coliseum in the background of Gil Hodges’ card. Gil would complete a three-year run of Gold Gloves at the conclusion of 1959. It was also his last year he would hit for double digits in home runs (25).

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More semi-stars and no I didn’t mean to segregate so my apologies, completely random. 1959 was Larry Doby’s last card. The former 7-time, American League All-Star would split his last season between Detroit and the Chicago White Sox. In only thirty-nine games, he would 26-113, 0 HRs, 13 RBI, and hit only .230. At age 35, he would out of baseball. Here’s an interesting fact about Minnie Minoso that I just learned … he led the American League in hit-by-pitch TEN TIMES!! Including a streak of six years from 1956-1961.

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Next were a bunch of Red Sox I still needed for my set. Ike Delock pitched all but 7 games in his career for Boston. If you happen to be a Sammy White super collector, you better be ready to spend some dough! He happens to be in a number of tough food issues from the 1950s. 1953 First National Supermarkets (Stop & Shop I believe), 1954 Red Heart Dog Food, 1954 Wilson Franks, 1955 Wilson Franks Booklets, and if those aren’t tough enough, he’s in the 1952 Topps high number series. Yikes!!!

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A handful of ex-Red Sox. Bob Smith is another (and not the same Bob Smith pictured as a Red Sox, 1958 Topps) guy I need to create a custom card for my All-Time Red Sox collection. Add Marv Grissom to that list. I do have a pretty decent B&W photo and where he played for the Sox in 1953, makes it easy to create a custom 1953 Bowman B&W card.

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Team cards galore!!! All but the Red Sox is marked but I got these for fifty cents apiece. I do wonder as it just caught my attention, why the Cubs card has “Cubs Team” and the other team cards do not. And why were the Cubs in all those team cards from the 1970s just their little heads ala 1963?? I always wondered why, why, why????

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Next up, some nice high numbers, one in particular Darrell Johnson was given to me for free by Mathew at Number 5 Type Collection who I met via Mark Hoyle at the show.

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And lastly, more cards from the high number series—the All-Star variety!! This batch of high number cards brings me to only nineteen more I need in the tough series. Of course, of those include the Bob Gibson rookie, Campanella, and All-Star cards of Mantle and Mays.

All in all, I ended completing eight pages in the 59 album, including one in the high series. And with that, off to do some freelance work and hopefully I’ll have some time to bang out a couple of quick custom cards that won’t need much work (ie; 1968 Floyd Robinson).

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1970 Topps Red Sox Rookie Stars Custom

In my pursuit to get a card of every player to have appeared in a game as a Boston Red Sox, many times it’s impossible to find. Maybe the player never appeared on a piece of cardboard. Or, they appeared on a gum card but in a different uniform.

About 10 years ago, I tried putting an all-time collection together, but too many times I ran into roadblocks. Sure, I was able to find some pictures online, but too often the images where too small or grainy from the get go. Maybe the card they appeared on was five years AFTER they played with the Sox. Today, and over the last couple of nights, I have found over three hundred and fifty images of past Red Sox players. I am still going through these images, as some do appear of sets like TCMA’s The 1930s Red Sox, or the 1972 Yawkey’s Red Sox set.

In the coming months to help me get through the New England winter, I’ll be creating many custom cards from these images. I have begun building out templates for the 1929-30 R315, 1936 Goudey, 1939 and 1940 Play Ball card sets.

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1970 Topps #721 Red Sox Rookie Stars (Option A)

So one of the players on my Red Sox needs list is one Tony Muser. Yup, the ex-manager for the Kansas City Royals was once a Red Sox farmhand. Before joining the Sox as a free agent, Muser was selected by the San Francisco Giants in 1966 amateur draft. On September 14, 1969, he collected his first major league hit in the top of the ninth. It would be his one hit and RBI that year — a two-out RBI single off Jack Aker to tie the game at Yankee Stadium. The Sox would lose in the bottom frame, 3-2. He appeared in one other game that September, ending the year at 1-9, with a walk and a strikeout. Tony spent the 1970 season at Boston’s AAA club Louisville. On March 31, 1971, he was dealt to the Chicago White Sox with Vicente Romo to the Chicago White Sox for Duane Josephson and Danny Murphy.

So finding an image of Tony Muser was a tough one. I know he appears in the 1969 Red Sox yearbook, a tiny black and white image the size of a postage stamp. The image I came across recently, is one of those Topps Vault images on eBay.

The image on the left felt too bright and saturated, so I went in and brought down the overall saturation of the colors and also some of the magenta from his face. I felt it was more inline with what could be found on a Topps card during the time.

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1970 Topps #721 Red Sox Rookie Stars (Option B)

Here is second option I created, swapping out the Fisk image for a different one.

My reasoning behind going a dual Rookie Stars card was it felt more believable. Back in the day, players actually appeared in the big leagues before making a cameo in bubble gum packs. So with that in mind, it crossed off doing a solo card of Muser on a 1969 Topps issue. I could have designed a solo 1970 Topps card, but with a lot of customs to do, I save some time not Photoshopping out the Topps watermark. Remember, we’re talking about a guy with only 10 ABs for the Sox, this dual card is just right.

Using Carlton Fisk also made sense as he too made his major league debut that same September. He would only play in two games going 0-5 with two strikeouts. Thankfully, the Sox didn’t trade HIM for two nobodies in 1971!

Please let me know your thoughts, and which Fisk image you prefer. For you Sox collectors, I’ll eventually print some, just need time and also figure what stock I can get through the printer without killing it. I want to find something matte, not gloss to make it feel a little more authentic. 

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As a sidenote, I have been practicing graphic design for over twenty-five years. As a kid, one of my dream jobs was to work for Topps or another baseball card company designing cards. I set these files up at 100% using Adobe InDesign, with any image work done in Photoshop. I did my best to match up colors using a Pantone PMS swatch book and tried to mirror the original fonts as close as possible. They tended to use different font families and several weights that make it tricky to mimic. If by some chance someone out there has a copy of the Topps graphic standard, if they ever had one in the 1960s/70s, that would be awesome.

A Trade with Highly Subjective and Completely Arbitrary

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A couple weeks ago, while blog hopping, I came upon Brian over at Highly Subjective and Completely Arbitrary. A couple of emails later, and the above package arrived. He will have a nice return coming back his way in the form of some vintage 60’s HoFers as he’s working on a bunch of sets. Without further ado and since many will be looking for a distraction tonight …

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Brian sent along a bunch of clean, sharp 1959 Topps cards for my growing set! These cards are absolutely beautiful and helps boost the appearance of my set. A couple of former Red Sox in the form of Mickey Vernon and Gus Zernial. Sal Maglie tossed a no-no with the Dodgers in 1956 and I love the classic baseball pose of one Harry Simpson.

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All in all, I was able to cross off nineteen numbers with this trade—that’s a great mail day!!! Billy Muffett would be appear as a Red Sox in the 1961 and 1962 Topps sets.

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And I have always liked these Sporting News Rookie Stars. This handful contains the Ron Fairly rookie and future Red Sox Willie Tasby, who would appear in the 1961 Post Cereal issue.

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Next up V-I-N-T-A-G-E SOX!!!!! A couple of Pre-War issues here to boot—all three will go nicely into my All-Time Sox album. On the left, is a 1934 Diamond Stars issue of Max Bishop. This is the first ’34 Diamond Stars card in my collection. Bishop had one particular notable game that year — on July 8, 1934, when he walked eight times in the doubleheader in Boston, tying his own major-league record.

In the middle is a 1940 Play Ball card of Denny Galehouse. Denny actually pitched for the Red Sox on different occasions. His first stop during 1939–40, he went a combined 15-16. Returning to the Hub in 1947–49, he would finish winning 19 and losing 15.

And on the right, a 1949 Bowman Jack Kramer. Before coming to Boston, Kramer was a two-time all-star as a St. Louis Brown. In 1948, Jack led the American League with a .783 winning percentage as he finished with 18 wins (AL-6th).

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And lastly, two more Sox cards. Don Buddin adorning a 1961 Post Cereal and a 1965 Topps Rico Petrocelli rookie card for my Sox rookie card collection. Both are welcome additions, especially Rico where I have a dupe of this card, but that one sits in my 1965 Topps album.

Brian also included a nice stack of 1984 and 1986 Topps cards. In the last week plus, I have made a serious dent in both of these sets thanks to a couple of bloggers. Thank you again Brian and I’ll be sending out your cards on Thursday morning—hope to trade again as your list is pretty lengthy!

Shriner’s Show Haul

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So Saturday, I finally had put some “me” time on the calendar to head up to Wilmington, Massachusetts for the annual fall GBSCC Shriner’s Show. It would also be a chance to finally meet Mark Hoyle, and in turn a couple other bloggers which I’ll touch on below.

Since I left the show, I haven’t had to time to cross off lists, take pictures, or even really look at my spoils. I left the show and raced home to catch my daughters soccer game and then the usually son’s soccer game on Sunday and a variety of chores kept side-tracking me. I’ll have to go more in depth on more of the haul, but for the time being (stuck in training today), I’m going to try to bang this out this morning while in training.

INSIDE THE NUMBERS

1959 Topps Set Needs: 111, including #1 Ford Frick and 8 high numbers cards and then one more high number thanks to Matt over at Number 5 Type Collection.

1965 Topps Set Needs: 78, including some a couple of Hall of Famers (Killebrew, Sphan second year) I was still in need of.

All-Time Red Sox Needs: 23, including four cards from the aforementioned Mark Hoyle.

I certainly saw a number of food issues from the 1970’s I was hoping to grab, but ran out of my budget money and time. My priorities here were to make a bigger dent into my ’59 and ’65 Topps sets and also try to find some Sox for my All-Time Collection. With that, lets jump in …

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I needed these 1973 Topps cards as I had pulled them from my Sox collection and used then in the 1973 Topps set I am also buidling.

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Same here with these 1968 Topps, have another copy of each of these in my ’68 set that I am building. This is Elston Howard’s last card of the one great Yankee backstop.

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Some late 50’s Topps cards I needed for the Sox collection.

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A bunch of early Bowman beauties here! 1949 Stan Spence, 1950 Walt Masterson, 1951’s Matt Batts and HoFer Lou Boudreau, and 1952 Vern Stephens. I absolutely love the artwork on these early 50s Bowman cards … maybe someday I’ll try working one one of those sets, probably the 1950 issue since I won’t have to worry about the Mantle or Mays rookies.

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A well loved 1939 Play Ball Jim Tabor. Nicked named “Rawhide”, Tabor was a five-tool player before that phrase became part of the baseball vernacular. Tabor earned his moniker with his hustle, his win-at-any-cost attitude, and his toughness. The condition of this card fits his nickname quite well as I write this. His best year was 1941 in which he batted .279, slugged 16 homers, drove in 101 runners, while adding 17 steals. Over the course of an average 162-season per Baseball-Reference.com, Tabor was a .270/16/97/11 hitter.

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Next up and my last purchase as I was quickly going around before heading out the door, a 1936 Goudey Rick Ferrell. I already have a graded PSA 4, 1935 Diamond Stars of the Hall of Famer, but that’s reserved in a box of graded Sox greats. I was able to grab this for less than a blaster of box at Target and looks better in person than this close up. For my All-Time Sox album, this card was perfect for crossing off Rick Ferrell. I also didn’t have one of these black and white Goudey, so that was a plus.

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And finally, some collections adds thanks to Mark Hoyle!!! This was the first time I met Mark in person and I’m sure it won’t be the last!! He handed my a couple more 1967 Dexter Press photo cards of George Smith and Hank Fischer as well as some cards I had in my collection years ago but traded them away for something I was collecting more at that time.

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These cards are part of a 24-card set that was produced my a Maine collector. They are cataloged as 1979 Early Red Sox Favorites in the Standard Catalog of Vintage Baseball Cards. Measuring a little larger than a standard size card at 2-5/8″ x 3-3/4″, these are printed in black and white. The set depicts players from the 1920s-1930s Red Sox and many of these features feature more than one player. These were just added to my All-Time Sox Collection want list (but still need to post above), but thanks to Mark I can cross off several!!

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Here are a couple of the backs to the cards above. Again, if anyone has some of the others, I’ll gladly trade for them!

Lastly, one of the highlights to the show in addition to meeting Mark, was meeting Joel Freedman from OBC from Matt from Number 5 Type Collection. Matt had picked up a number of off-conditioned 1959 Topps high numbers for a buck a piece and knew I was collecting the set. Out of the blue and he said pick up that you need, so #533 Darrell Johnson was added to my set. Thanks Matt!! Mark introduced me to them and managed to chat for about 20-plus minutes (or maybe it was longer). This was the first time I had met other bloggers at a show like this. It really was a great example of how great this hobby can be! I know I’ll definitely try to hook up with Mark again a local show in Mansfield and there’s talk about getting together some night in Providence (RI) for dinner, drinks, and shop talk.

My apologies for any typos, run-on sentences, and the like, but wanted to post with the short time I had this morning. Thank you guys for making a great day even better!

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Also of note, I have some trade packages I need to get out the door in the next couple of days (Brian, Bert, John Miller, and Tony. Scott Crawford, still working on yours and probably close to an 600-800 count box at the moment). Also need to post a recent trade from Brian as well so a busy week ahead here at Off the Wall.

Joy of a Completed Page

Ahh, another page down in my 1965 Topps set. This completed page was made from a recent trade with Shane over at Shoebox Legends. Thank you again Shane!!!

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1965 Topps #136-144

Card that completed the page: 1965 Rookie Stars – Pirates (#143). On April 1, 1969, John Gelnar now with the Kansas City Royals, would be sent packing with Steve Whitaker to the Seattle Pilots for one Lou Piniella. All Sweet Lou did in 1969 was be named the American League Rookie of the Year. Besides looking like a space cadet, Jerry May actually had a 10-year career as a backup backstop.

Favorite card: Not sure I have one that really stands out. I pretty much like any World Series out there, especially back in the days when the had the box scores on the flip side.

Best photograph: The Cards Celebrate (#139), like the Chicago Cubs the other night, there’s nothing like watching the celebration of winning a World Series. Here the Redbirds have every right to jump for joy as they would defeat the New York Yankees. 1964 was the Yanks last shining moment till the mid-late 1970’s.

Best career: Bob Gibson (#138). A Hall of Famer and one of the most intimidating hurlers to ever step on the bump. He’s one of three guys on this page to throw Major League no-hitters. The other two—Monbouquette in 1962 and Dean Chance threw one as a Minnesota Twin in 1967. In August of ’71, Gibson tossed his against the would be World Series Champion Pittsburgh Pirates, 11-0.

Number of Red Sox: One. Bill Monbouquette (#142). As the Red Sox made a beeline for last place, Monbo threw a no-hitter against the White Sox on August 1. A tight 1-0 game, Boston scored its one run in the eighth inning off Early Wynn. Bill is also a member of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame.

Past/Future Red Sox: Zero.

Interesting fact: Charlie James (#141)… James had a Friday-night-performance phenomenon that proved quite newsworthy for the 1962 season. On Friday nights he batted .411 with 23 hits and six of his eight home runs (with 23 RBIs). For the season, he batted .276 with 59 RBIs.

Hopefully I’ll come out of tomorrow’s GBSCC Shriner’s Show. Haven’t been to this event in maybe 6 years so looking forward to seeing what I’ll find!!!

 

A Whole Lotta Stuff in the Shoebox

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A couple years ago when I was blogging over on my Blogger page, I had remembered reading the Shoebox Legends blog often. I’m not why I never reached out to trade, probably as both of us are Red Sox collectors, maybe I felt we wouldn’t be a match.

Fast forward two plus years, and through a trade with the great Mark Hoyle, he said I should reach out to Shane at the aforementioned Shoebox Legends. He said he was a great guy and trade partner and also lived in the area.

As noted on Shane’s great blog last week, I sent him a bunch of 59 Topps for his set that he is working on and this week I received the above package so lets dig in.

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First up in the package was some vintage: two 1959 Topps, two 1965 Topps, one of which completed a page and nice Pete Rose/George Foster NLCS Playoff card.

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Some awesome vintage Kellogg’s cards: 1970 Ray Culp, and 1972 versions of Joe Coleman and Bill Parsons. These cards are in great condition with no cracks! I already have a Willie Mays and Tony Perez from the 1972 set.

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A little retro vintage sampling here from the 2012 Topps Archives set. These are my first insert cards from this set.

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And finally some Red Sox cards including the signed Clay Buchholz card. I don’t have an autographed card of Clay so that will go into my Sox odd ball album. I didn’t do any individual scans, but you can see in the first image a boatload of 1984 Topps flagship. Shane easily cleared what seemed half to two-thirds of my needs list for this set.

Thank you again for the trade Shane and I’m sure we’ll trade again down the road. Speaking of down the road, I’ll have to meet up with you and Mark Hoyle the next time you’re in Providence!!